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Chroma

A Photographer's Guide to Lighting with Color

Learning to work with light is an important milestone in every photographer’s career, and the ability to craft light to fit your vision for an image is a skill that cannot be overrated. Most often, that crafting of light is spoken of in terms of the quality and quantity of...
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  • Print and eBook Bundle: $44.99
  • Print Book: $34.95
  • eBook: $27.99

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BOOK AUTHOR

Nick Fancher

PAGE COUNT

240 pages

TRIM SIZE

7x9in

COVER

Soft Cover- without flaps

ISBN

9781681983103

PUBLISH DATE

08/2018

  • CHROMA: A Photographers Guide to Lighting with Color
  • Table of Contents
  • Chapter 1: Getting Started with Gels
  • Chapter 2: Ambient Light: Correcting vs. Pushing
  • Chapter 3: Creative Colors
  • Chapter 4: Layering Colors
  • Chapter 5: Modifier Options
  • Chapter 6: Gobos
  • Chapter 7: Mixing Hard and Soft Strobe
  • Chapter 8: Mixing Strobe and Ambient
  • Chapter 9: Catching the Light
  • Chapter 10: Color in Black and White

2 reviews for Chroma

  • (verified owner)

    This is another good book from NICK. I did read his “Studio Anywhere 1” and then “Studio Anywhere 2”. CHROMA is further application of his lighting concept especially on the technique on applying HARD LIGHT with colour. Before this book, I was scared to use hard light and very confused with the colour management in photography. I did learn a lot from this book and give me a lot of inspiration on using hard light on other photography. Thank you NICK and Rockynook!

  • Chroma explores the creative use of color when lighting portraits. The images in the book’s galleries well-illustrate Fancher’s manipulations of colored lighting through the use of filters and white balance.

    The first several chapters are excellent summaries of color theory, post-production techniques and the basic, inexpensive gear required to pursue Fancher’s looks. The chapters that follow read like a journal of Fancher’s experimental work- written in the first person, he explains concepts and tools including shutter drag, gobos, and the use of projections. The lighting during the shoot is the primary focus of the text, though post-production techniques are also utilized to “clean up” and better control the extreme colors that are inherently hard to shoot as desired.

    The “look” that Fancher pursues is something you’ll either find appealing or not- it’s nearly all portraiture, but not at all the standard portraiture that most photographers pursue. The harsh, over-saturated, and often low-key images are interesting and certainly demand patience and time-intensive experimentation to achieve.

    While the look is not of interest to me, I appreciate the creativity and experimental spirit that Fancher displays in the book. The works are artsy, moody and unique- and the process of achieving them will certainly help one to develop both an eye and the technical expertise to become stronger at portrait lighting.

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